Digital Divide Update

Digital Divide Update

Technology has a foothold in every aspect of today’s society but many children in the heart of Appalachia are getting left behind as for their parents a computer and internet service is simply a “luxury” they cannot afford. Last year, Americans Helping Americans® launched a pilot program to bridge the digital divide and supplied 24 elementary students in Beattyville, Kentucky with desktop computers for use at home. Because of the great success of the program, we saw the children improve their grades on assignments and keep in touch via email with their teachers on days they were sick or school was closed due to inclement weather! Feedback from teachers is that the computers provided to the students allowed the children to further educate themselves and research topics of interest to them. The students were able to get deep into a topic, gather more details, and use that information to support their answers with low-cost internet service in a partnership between the school and AT&T.

The students love to learn with computers. It’s fun for them! They can play online learning games to help with lessons and they become more tech savvy! Americans Helping Americans® is extremely proud of the students’ accomplishments and this year we were able to send an additional 30 computers to new students!

Among the 75 letters from children requesting their reason for needing a computer are:

“Most of the time I struggle on tests, but with this computer, I could study much more fluently and do better on tests.” – Kalib

“One way in which a computer would be beneficial to me is to be able to work on my online school problems. I could work on my Lexia, to build on my reading and math comprehension. I could do my Moby Max, an online max and reading program. I could study islands which helps learn about social studies.” – Kaison

“My first reason is teacher communication. I could e-mail questions if I am having trouble with my work. I could complete assignments that I have missed if I was ill. I could also facetime or skype my teachers if I need to.” –Allyson

Americans Helping Americans® is proud of your support to our programs like this! We hope to provide computers to entire schools and train the next generation of tech-savvy children in the years to come so they can have bright futures and sharp minds. Computer Science opportunities are always increasing and who knows, maybe you helped the next Bill Gates get their very first computer.

90 Years of life

90 Years of life

To the loyal supporters of Americans Helping Americans®,

What a year it’s been…and indeed what a lifetime it has been!

Last week, as I approached my 90th birthday, I couldn’t help but reflect on all that we together have accomplished to help many of the most impoverished of communities in America.

Since incorporating Americans Helping Americans® in 1990 we have helped thousands of children succeed in school by supporting after-school programs, helped senior citizens living on meager fixed incomes with repairs to their house enabling them to remain in the home they love, and provided tens of thousands with winter coats, blankets, and shoes.

I will never forget that day in the mid-1980s when I first visited hard-hit communities in West Virginia and observed the conditions our fellow Americans live in. One man, as I entered his house, told me to watch my step because his floor was rotted through.

For years, I have been honored to partner with grassroots organizations in Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia and elsewhere who work tirelessly filled with dedication and determination providing assistance to the most in need in their communities. The only thing these local groups lack is resources.

And that’s where you come in, and for which I am so very appreciative.

None of this would be possible without the compassion and generosity of fellow Americans like you, coast to coast. Without your support, tens of thousands of children over the years would’ve been standing in the frigid weather wearing threadbare outerwear waiting for their school bus to arrive. Without you, seniors unable to pay their utility would risk losing their home.

Thanks to you, 50 elementary school students at in Beattyville, Kentucky will have computers by Christmas Day as we initiated a pilot program to bridge the digital divide enabling not only the students themselves to have an all-in-one desktop at home to do their homework, conduct research and e-mail their teachers when school is closed for inclement weather but their siblings as well. In these modern times, a computer at home is not a luxury but a necessity to succeed in school and keep up with their classmates and not fall behind on assignments.

It fills my heart with pride and joy that over the past nearly three decades you have made my vision a reality. All I can offer is to express my deepfelt gratitude for everything we together have accomplished and a sincere thank you on behalf of thousands whose lives you have made better.

Thank you for the Coats

Thank you for the Coats

The frigid days of winter are already upon the communities in the mountainous regions of Appalachia. That’s why each year, we distribute thousands of coats and winter accessories to our partners, such as Big Creek People in Action (BCPIA) in McDowell County, and others in the Appalachian regions of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and elsewhere.

Last December, thanks to our supporters, we were able to provide hundreds of heavy winter coats which BCPIA distributed to the neediest children and adults in their community.

“We recently had a free giveaway and were able to offer coats, shoes, and hats. I am sure many people would not think of this as a big thing – but it is a big thing in our community,” reported BCPIA co-executive director Marsha Timpson.

In Beattyville, Kentucky, our partner, the Lee County Family Resource Center located in the local elementary school, distributed hundreds of coats to students in the fall. They keep a reserve supply on hand for those cold winter days when a child shows up for school without any kind of coat or jacket.

Through our “Coats for Americans” initiative, we strive to supply our partners with enough coats to meet their ever-increasing demands.

Nothing gives them, and us, more satisfaction than seeing the huge smile on the face of a child when they put on their very own brand-new colorful new coat.

“I want to thank Big Creek People In Action for the winter coats they have given out this year,” said Brandi. “Every time I have gone to Big Creek People In Action they have signs posted that the coats came from Americans Helping Americans®.

#Coats4Americans: A campaign to provide coats for children in Appalachia.

#Coats4Americans: A campaign to provide coats for children in Appalachia.

n McDowell County, West Virginia the weather forecast for November 19 calls for a low of 24 degrees and snow showers, and that’s just the start of a frigid winter to come in that mountainous region of Appalachia where the average low in December is 24 and 21 in January –  not including the wind chill factor!

Each year, Americans Helping Americans® distributes thousands of coats and winter accessories to our partners, such as Big Creek People in Action (BCPIA) in McDowell County, and others in the Appalachian regions of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and elsewhere.

Last December, thanks to the supporters of Americans Helping Americans®, we were able to provide hundreds of heavy winter coats which BCPIA distributed to the neediest children and adults in their community.

“We recently had a free giveaway and were able to offer coats, shoes and hats. I am sure many people would not think of this as a big thing – but it is a big thing in our community,” reported BCPIA co-executive director Marsha Timpson. 

In Beattyville, Kentucky, described by The New York Times as one of the “hardest places in the country to live,” our partner there, the Lee County Family Resource Center located in the local elementary school, distributed hundreds of coats to students in the fall, and keeps a reserve supply on hand for those cold winter days when a child shows up for school without any kind of coat or jacket.

Through our “Coats for Americans” initiative, we strive to supply our partners with enough coats to meet their ever-increasing demands. Nothing gives them, and us, more satisfaction than seeing the huge smile on the face of a child when they put on their very own brand-new colorful new coat for the first time with the knowledge that they will not be standing shivering in a threadbare hand-me-down at the bus stop this winter.

“I want to thank Big Creek People In Action for the winter coats they have given out this year,” said Brandi. “Every time I have gone to Big Creek People In Action they have signs posted that the coats came from Americans Helping Americans®.

“Please tell them I said thank you so much.”

 

Helping fellow Americans in Puerto Rico

Helping fellow Americans in Puerto Rico

Last night, we joined the efforts of the First Lady of Puerto Rico by donating $5,000 to assist in meeting the basic survival needs of food, clothing, and shelter of the people of Puerto Rico, and to help facilitate the rebuilding of lives and communities.

We stand with the people of Puerto Rico in their rebuilding efforts, and we commend the First Lady for her quick action in raising support for the Unidos por Puerto Rico Fund.

Helping our fellow Americans has been, and will continue to be, our mission.

Announcing our SMILES program… providing children and youth with dental kits throughout Appalachia

Announcing our SMILES program… providing children and youth with dental kits throughout Appalachia

At Americans Helping Americans® we understand the great need for preventative dental care for children, beginning when they are able to hold a toothbrush and brush their teeth themselves.

In Appalachia, that’s too often not the case.

Now, we are proud to announce that we will be implementing a ‘Smiles’ program, providing children and youth with dental kits, complete with toothbrushes, a three-month supply of toothpaste and dental floss picks to thousands of children throughout Appalachia in the coming year.

The statistics regarding oral health in Appalachia are staggering: in Kentucky, almost half of children ages 2 to 4 years old already have untreated cavities caused by drinking large quantities of sugary soft drinks and no preventative dental care.

Kentucky also has the highest proportion of adults under 65 without teeth.

West Virginia fares no better as having the highest proportion of adults over 65 without teeth, as well having one of the lowest percentages of adults who visit a dentist at least once a year.

And other statistics are just as disturbing, with two-thirds of children having cavities by age 8, and by the same age, only 37 percent have received protective sealants. In addition, a third- of 15-year-olds have untreated decay.

For years, we have having been providing assistance to senior citizens who have already lost their teeth by working with our partners in Appalachia and compassionate dentists who charge deeply discounted prices for dentures.

Now we are pleased that we be able to offer preventative care for the children of Appalachia in our mission to help them keep their teeth for their lifetime by building a sound foundation of tooth care today.